Archives for posts with tag: London

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Thousands of cyclists rode slowly past parliament in one of the bigger two-wheeled protests seen in Britain in recent years, timed to coincide with a Commons debate on measures designed to significantly boost cycling around the country. The mass event was timed to coincide with Commons debate after transport department junks Get Britain Cycling report.

The protest, organised by the London Cycling Campaign (LCC), will set off from the south bank of the Thames, before snaking around Parliament Square. It is hard to predict numbers, but they are expected to be high, with feeder rides joining from several other parts of the capital.

The event, billed Space for Cycling, has two purposes: firstly, to pressure London’s mayor, Boris Johnson, into speeding up a programme to make the city’s roads more cycle-friendly; and also to remind MPs and ministers in the Commons chamber that there is an appetite for change among two-wheeled voters nationally.

One of those waiting at the start of the protest, Holi-May Thomas, from Brixton in south London, was joining the event on a sturdy sit-up-and-beg bike, wearing a summer dress and no helmet (“I’ve got a sensible bike but I’m not a sensible girl”).

The 27-year-old cafe manager said she rode everywhere but wanted to call for more respect for cyclists on the road: “It can be scary, and there’s so many reasons why cycling is good for a city. We all need to be able to share the roads better.”

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/sep/02/cycling-protesters-surround-parliament-london

http://www.demotix.com/photo/2566931/london-cyclists-demand-safer-streets-and-space-cycling

Liberate Tate is a network dedicated to taking creative disobedience against Tate until it drops its oil company funding.

The network was founded during a workshop in January 2010 on art and activism, commissioned by Tate.

When Tate curators tried to censor the workshop from making interventions against Tate sponsors, even though none had been planned, the incensed participants decided to continue their work together beyond the workshop and set up Liberate Tate.

LIBERATE TATE COMMUNIQUE #1 MAY 2010 – Released during Tate Modern’s 10 year Birthday Celebration Weekend.

Dear Tate

Happy Birthday. We wish we could celebrate with you. But we can’t.

As we write, your corporate sponsor BP is creating the largest oil painting in the world, inspired by profit margins and a culture that puts money in front of life, its shadowy stain shimmers across the Gulf of Mexico. A toxic tide that turns thriving ecosystems into deserts and deprives cultures of their way of life, it is one of the world’s greatest works of corporate art, a work that reeks of death and speaks of our society’s failure of imagination.

Every day Tate scrubs clean BP’s public image with the detergent of cool progressive culture. But there is nothing innovative or cutting edge about a company that knowingly feeds our addiction to fossil fuels despite a climate crisis, a company whose greed has killed twenty-one employees in just over a year, a company that continues to invest in the cancer-causing climate crimes of tar sands in Alberta, Canada.

By placing the words BP and Art together, the destructive and obsolete nature of the fossil fuel industry is masked, and crimes against the future are given a slick and stainless sheen.

Every time we step inside the museum Tate makes us complicit with these acts, acts that will one day seem as archaic as the slave trade, as anachronistic as public executions Every time Nicholas Serota is asked how a museum that prides itself on dealing with climate change can be funded by an oil company he responds that there are no plans to abandon BP sponsorship (anything to do with having an ex-CEO of BP chair Tate’s board of trustees?).

When art activist group The Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination were invited to run a workshop on art and civil disobedience, they were told by curators that they could not take any action against Tate and its sponsors and the workshop was policed by the curators to make sure the artists produced work “commensurate with the Tate’s mission”. In March 2010, Tate Modern ran an eco symposium, “Rising to the Climate Change Challenge: Artists and Scientists Imagine Tomorrow’s World”, on the same day that Tate Britain was celebrating twenty years of BP sponsorship with one of its ‘BP Saturdays’ Incensed by this censorship and hypocrisy, participants in the symposium called for a vote: 80% of the audience agreed that BP sponsorship should be dropped by 2012.

So today we offer you a birthday present, a gift to liberate Tate from its old-fashioned fossil fuel addiction – a gift for the future. Beginning during your 10th anniversary party and continuing until you drop the sponsorship deal, we will be commissioning a series of art interventions in Tate buildings across the country. Already commissioned are Art Action collective, with a birthday surprise at this weekend’s No Soul For Sale event, and The Invisible Committee, who will infiltrate every corner of Tate across the country in the coming months.

We invite artists to join us and act to liberate Tate. Free art from oil.

http://liberatetate.wordpress.com/

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1 skyscraper. 6 women. No permission. What will you do to save the Arctic?

Victo, Ali, Sabine, Sandra, Liesbeth & Wiola

Why are we doing this?

We’re attempting to scale the Shard to send a message to the headquarters of oil giant Shell.

In the last 30 years we’ve lost 80% of the Arctic sea ice.

The white ice cap at the top of the world has shrunk so much that scientists say the North Pole could be ice free any time in the next few decades. The last time there was no Arctic sea ice was 800,000 years ago.

The survival of polar bears and other iconic species is threatened by that melt. But the Arctic is more than just a home for polar bears. The vast white ice sheets reflects the sun’s rays back into space, cooling the entire Earth.

As the ice disappears our global weather becomes more unpredictable. Farming gets harder. Hunger gets worse.

The Arctic is a vital part of our home and that’s why it matters to everyone on our shared planet to protect it.

Shell and other oil companies want to use the melting Arctic to drill for oil. They want to drill in the places they can only now reach because the ice is melting. And burning that oil only accelerates the melt.

It’s a vicious circle that only makes sense if you’re an oil executive thinking about your company’s short-term profits. Or you’re a politician hoping some quick money will help you win the next election.

But we are not those people. We have a responsibility to think bigger than that.

What we decide today about the Arctic and climate change will affect humanity long after these oil company logos and opportunistic politicians are forgotten.

That’s why we’re up here, scaling this skyscraper modelled on a shard of ice. As we look down, we’re in the midpoint of Shell’s three London offices. From here we want to send them a message they won’t forget.

If we make it to the top, we hope to install a giant piece of art that will show the true beauty of the Arctic and why we’re telling Shell to keep its rusty rigs away. We can see them, so we know they can see us.

http://iceclimb.savethearctic.org/